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Same-sex relationships are still a crime in 69 countries

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Posted at 10:04 AM, Sep 07, 2018
and last updated 2018-09-07 10:04:56-04

India has struck down a colonial-era law punishing consensual gay sex, but there are still 69 other countries with laws on the books that criminalize same-sex sexual activity between consenting adults.

Some countries, such as Papua New Guinea and the United Arab Emirates, jail people in openly same-sex relationships for decades. And in Iran, Sudan and Yemen, they can end up on death row.

Of the 193 countries recognized by the United Nations, the following criminalize same-sex relations, according to the Geneva-based International Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans and Intersex Association, which advocates on behalf of more than 1,300 member organizations across the world.

Africa

  • Algeria
  • Angola
  • Botswana
  • Comoros
  • Eritrea
  • Ethiopia
  • Gambia
  • Ghana
  • Guinea
  • Kenya
  • Liberia
  • Libya
  • Malawi
  • Mauritania
  • Mauritius
  • Morocco
  • Namibia
  • Nigeria
  • Senegal
  • Sierra Leone
  • Somalia
  • South Sudan
  • Sudan
  • Swaziland
  • Tanzania
  • Togo
  • Tunisia
  • Uganda
  • Zambia
  • Zimbabwe

Americas

  • Antigua and Barbuda
  • Barbados
  • Dominica
  • Grenada
  • Guyana
  • Jamaica
  • St. Kitts & Nevis
  • St. Lucia
  • St. Vincent & the Grenadines

Asia

  • Afghanistan
  • Bangladesh
  • Bhutan
  • Brunei Darussalam
  • Iran
  • Iraq
  • Kuwait
  • Lebanon
  • Malaysia
  • Maldives
  • Myanmar
  • Oman
  • Pakistan
  • Qatar
  • Saudi Arabia
  • Singapore
  • Sri Lanka
  • Syria
  • Turkmenistan
  • United Arab Emirates
  • Uzbekistan
  • Yemen

Oceania

  • Kiribati
  • Papua New Guinea
  • Samoa
  • Solomon Islands
  • Tonga
  • Tuvalu