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2 men kicked out of National Guard over ties to white supremacist group, reports say

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Posted at 11:20 AM, Dec 27, 2019
and last updated 2019-12-27 11:22:25-05

The Army National Guard has removed two members from the service after months of investigations stemming from allegations that the men were part of a white supremacist group, the Atlanta Constitution-Journal reports.

According to the AJC, Dalton Woodward and Trent East are no longer part of their National Guard Units following an investigation into allegations of their allegiance to the Asatru Folk Assembly, which researchers have identified a group with ties to white supremacy.

The allegations into Woodward and East were first published earlier this year by activist group Atlanta Antifascists. Following the allegation, the National Guard conducted a months-long investigation into Woodward's and East's ties to the group.

East reportedly confirmed to the AJC that he received an official notice of his separation from the Alabama National Guard on Dec. 14. However, the investigation is still considered "open," and East has 45 days to dispute the decision. According to East, the Army has recommended he be granted a "general discharge" — a step down from the typical "honorable discharge," which indicates "unacceptable conduct not in accord with military standards."

Dalton, a former member of the Georgia National Guard, was reportedly deployed to Afghanistan at the time Atlanta Antifascists alleged his allegiance to Asatru Folk Assembly. He returned home in June. A spokesperson for the Georgia National Guard confirmed to the AJC that Dalton is no longer a member, but declined to comment further.

According to the Southern Poverty Law Center, the Asatru Folk Assembly is a Neo-Völkisch group — a group that basis spirituality through connection with white European ancestors and calls for the preservation of what they call a dying culture.

The AJC also reports that Dalton and East attended a rally hosted by white supremacist Richard Spencer at Auburn University in 2017 and carried signs.